QR codes for indigenous-named events

The next time you promote an event that has an indigenous name, or a department or project, remember that some of your audience will have difficulty reading, pronouncing, or even understanding the name. QR codes can help by connecting your printed materials to audio and video. The QR codes can be placed on flyers, posters, business cards, and other promotional items.

Here is what a QR code looks like:

A QR code is actually a Web address that looks like a strange 2D picture.

To get this technique to work, you will need to create a Web page that has the audio or video recording, of someone pronouncing the name of your event.

For help with this technique, Community Heritage Labs offers training and technology for communities and local governments. We can help with any of the tasks explained here, and we offer training for your staff. Contact us to get started.

How the QR code is used

There are many free QR code scanners that can be found in the App Store and in Google Play. Organizations like schools, libraries, language programs, and community centers can purchase a tablet and then preload a QR scanner onto the table, for use in a room or building.

Steps:

  1. From a mobile device, open the app for scanning Qr codes.
  2. Then point the mobile device’s camera at a QR code.
  3. The app will convert the QR code into an actual Web address and take you to the address, from within your mobile device’s Web browser.

Since each of the free apps that scan QR codes are slightly different from one another, the steps listed above will vary slightly.

Pros and cons

Here are some of the pros:

  • The more people who know how to pronounce the name of your event the better and will hopefully filter down into your everyday communication with these organizations and to your target audience.
  • Schools, libraries, language programs, and community centers can still purchase a tablet for use within a room or building.

Here are some of the cons:

  • In many indigenous communities access to mobile devices and the Internet is limited.
  • Making a Web page about the name of your event, including audio and video, can be challenging.

How to add QR codes to your printed materials

You will need to have a Web page created that has all the information you want to provide, about the indigenous name given to your event.

Steps:

  1. Once your Web page is ready, copy the Web address.
  2. Go to QR Code Generator and paste in the Web address into the form.
  3. This will generate a QR code that you can save to your computer.
  4. Finally, give the QR code to your graphic designer, or if that’s you then add the image to the files that you plan to print and give out.

If your materials are already printed, you might consider printing the QR codes on square labels for adhering to the printed materials (see Avery or Uline for square labels). You might also give out the labels as a promotional item itself. In that case, you will want to add additional information on the label such as a logo, name, contact info or other promotional information.

QR codes in education

QR codes are popular in education and can be used in creative ways to get kids moving around the classroom, using mobile devices (which they love) and learning.

Here are some examples:

Using QR Codes in the Classroom to Enhance Learning

8 Ways I Make Learning Fun by Using QR Codes in the Classroom

25 Fun Ways to Use QR Codes for Teaching and Learning

Our services

Community Heritage Labs offers training and technology for communities and local governments. We can help with any of the tasks explained here, and we offer training for your staff. Contact us to get started.

Author: Biagio Arobba

Much of my interests in community and arts projects come from personal experiences: Native American languages (my grandparents spoke the Lakota language), star quilt making, diet and exercise, and food computers. It all fits in a practical yet holistic viewpoint of the world.

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